Interior Designers

Sample of reported job titles:

Interior Design Consultant,

Interior Design Coordinator,

Interior Designer,

Designer

Plan, design, and furnish the internal space of rooms or buildings. Design interior environments or create physical layouts that are practical, aesthetic, and conducive to the intended purposes. May specialize in a particular field, style, or phase of interior design.

What Do They Typically Do?

  • Design plans to be safe and to be compliant with the American Disabilities Act (ADA).
  • Coordinate with other professionals, such as contractors, architects, engineers, and plumbers, to ensure job success.
  • Inspect construction work on site to ensure its adherence to the design plans.
  • Use computer-aided drafting (CAD) and related software to produce construction documents.
  • Advise client on interior design factors, such as space planning, layout and use of furnishings or equipment, and color coordination.
  • Confer with client to determine factors affecting planning of interior environments, such as budget, architectural preferences, purpose, and function.
  • Estimate material requirements and costs, and present design to client for approval.
  • Review and detail shop drawings for construction plans.
  • Formulate environmental plan to be practical, esthetic, and conducive to intended purposes, such as raising productivity or selling merchandise.
  • Design spaces to be environmentally friendly, using sustainable, recycled materials when feasible.

Interests

Career interests describe the perspectives and interests of people who enjoy the type of work involved in this career.

Discover what your interests are by taking the Interest Profiler Quiz

Skills

People who want to pursue this career have skills in these areas.

Top Skills
Active Listening

Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Critical Thinking

Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions, or approaches to problems.

Reading Comprehension

Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work-related documents.

Values

Work values describe how your core beliefs align with those commonly needed for this career.

Top Values
Achievement

Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

Independence

Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.

Relationships

Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.

Abilities

Whether you have received formal training or not, these types of abilities are helpful in this career.

Top Cognitive Abilities
Originality

The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem.

Fluency of Ideas

The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity).

Near Vision

The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).

Does this sound like something you'd like to do?

1. Learn more about this career

Talk to someone who works in this field or spend a day job shadowing

2. Prepare for training

Use the colleges and training directory to explore programs related to this career

3. Talk to a mentor for more information
  • Visit your school counselor
  • Talk to a career planner, advisor, or school admissions staff