Education & Training

Apprenticeships & Work-Based Learning

Work-based learning opportunities help you train for a job from a practical standpoint, rather than the more theoretical approach you might find in a traditional college classroom. Some options even provide the chance to pursue formal education while working. You can build your resume, work toward certifications and credentials, and earn a wage at the same time.

Practical Experience

Learn Through Work

Clinical: Like an internship, clinical opportunities are most often part of health career prep programs, where students observe and treat patients with oversight from a professional.

Co-Op: A cooperative education experience, commonly known as a “co-op”, provides academic credit for structured job experience (that includes some classroom-based education). Students are generally paid by their employer for work time and graduate with significant work experience.

Pre-Apprenticeship: A program where students learn basic technical and job-readiness skills for designated apprenticeable occupations or industry sectors, to prepare them for a Registered Apprenticeship. Pre-apprenticeships combine time in a classroom or lab setting with worksite visits, job shadowing, or other activities that help students learn about the work environment. Credit for the “classroom” instruction may apply to the student’s registered apprenticeship program.

Internship: A paid or unpaid position where a person can work in an organization to gain professional experience. Students may earn high school or college credit for internships.

Earn While You Learn

Learn at Work

Apprenticeship: A combination of on-the-job training (OJT) and formal instruction, under the supervision of a skilled mentor. Apprentices receive training in the practical and theoretical aspects of a skilled occupation. During their training period, apprentices earn a wage/salary and may be eligible for raises based on time completed or competency. Completing an apprenticeship leads to an industry-recognized credential.

Registered Apprenticeship: While programmatically the same as non-registered apprenticeships, Registered Apprenticeships monitored by the U.S. Department of Labor, and the credential is nationally recognized.

On-the-Job Training (OJT): Training that occurs for employees at a job site or office and is led by a company supervisor or mentor. The employer determines the skills they want employees to acquire and how their competency will be measured.

School to Registered Apprenticeship: An extension of a Registered Apprenticeship for high school students, 16 years old and above. As described above, all requirements for a Registered Apprenticeship program must be met and students have to get approval from both their high school and parents to participate.

Information Center

Self-Assessment & Planning Tools

Considering an apprenticeship, clinical practicum, or cooperative work experience (co-op) but not sure in what field or industry? Use these interactive quizzes and planning tools to explore how your interests can translate into a career you can pursue through work-based learning.

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